yearbook templates

Modular Yearbook Design Made Easy

Ever look at other schools' yearbook spreads and think, "They must have a designer doing their book for them." Guess what? So can you. Pictavo employs a team of professional graphic designers that work year round on art creation, template design and Snippet design for use exclusively in Pictavo! Take a look at just a few ways to use some of the new Snippet designs available for the 2017 school year!

Interviewing students about non-school related subjects can be a fun way to keep your audience interested.

Interviewing students about non-school related subjects can be a fun way to keep your audience interested.

Inclusion can be your biggest sales tool! Use Snippets as a way to complete your coverage goals!

Inclusion can be your biggest sales tool! Use Snippets as a way to complete your coverage goals!

Everyone says something worth reading at some point...quote them in the yearbook!

Everyone says something worth reading at some point...quote them in the yearbook!

You publish an elementary yearbook? Snippets are also great for elementary or middle school books! You choose the topic, fill with images and info from your student body and you're done!

By using the set of tools Pictavo provides, anyone can create a well-designed, modern yearbook that students will love to look at. Have fun with your staff...get creative!

Now What? Creating Yearbook Templates Like A Pro

Many advisers wonder what to do with their classes once their yearbook is submitted. How about starting on next year's book?

Creating a yearbook is a huge undertaking. What if you could shave off a task or two before the previous school year was over? Obviously it isn't possible to start assigning photography assignments or writing features, but it's possible to start organizing. What went well this year? What needs some work? Make those notes and change procedures now.

If you aren't a school that already takes advantage of templates, now is the time! In fact, spring is an ideal time to start designing a book's worth of custom templates for the following year. This is also a really great design exercise for your students...whether done in the spring or the fall. The most creative version of this exercise is using the internet (Pinterest - or Padlet if your school wants more security than Pinterest offers) to find layouts you're inspired by and applying the same look or feel to a layout for your yearbook. For example, we chose a layout from a newsletter we have pinned on one of our Pinterest boards and recreated it using Pictavo. Do this a dozen or so times and you've basically got a library full of templates to tweak once a theme is decided upon next year. Have twenty students? Have them each choose two layouts as inspiration and recreate, you suddenly have forty templates to choose from.

Original envato designed "student newsletter" template pinned to our Design Inspiration board.

Original envato designed "student newsletter" template pinned to our Design Inspiration board.

Practice layout created using Pictavo. Same basic design elements applied to a yearbook layout, inspired by, but not identical to, the layout above.

Practice layout created using Pictavo. Same basic design elements applied to a yearbook layout, inspired by, but not identical to, the layout above.

Keep in mind that your new library of templates won't all use the same fonts, spacing or design elements. It will be up to the yearbook staff to edit and create a sense of theme or connection throughout the book. For a truly cohesive yearbook theme, we suggest creating a style guide early in the year for your staff to follow.

Almost There - Proofing your yearbook before submission

Create a team of yearbook 'proofers' to check your staff's work!

Create a team of yearbook 'proofers' to check your staff's work!

 It's spring. That means time to submit your yearbook. You've worked hard and the finish line is well within reach, time to double check all the work your team has done before calling it a year!

The best plan of attack for proofing your yearbook is this: NEW EYES. Don't rely on the person that worked on the book to be able to find their own mistakes. Always let someone else take a look at it. If your book is particularly large, create an entire proofing team.

Break the book into sections so each person has a task that feels possible rather than overwhelming. For instance, have a separate person check each of the following: headlines, spelling of names (one person per grade), matching of names to faces, images make sense on the spread (sometimes there are placeholders that don't get replaced), captions (full sentences, proper grammar), text boxes (no "double click to edit text" hanging around anywhere) and just overall layout (make sure nothing is covering an image, words getting hidden, etc.)

If you can pull together an entire group of people to page through your yearbook and all give the seal of approval, you are, officially, ready to submit. Congratulations!

 

To Theme or Not To Theme

Fall is winding down, the holidays are just around the corner. The first steps of your yearbook project are, surely, already done. You've decided on the basic layout of your book, you've created a ladder detailing what falls where on your pages, and you've most likely decided on a theme.

We'd like to provide you with a little inspiration from a few schools that did a great job continuing their theme throughout their book.

This first school stuck with school colors through the entire book. A few key design elements (dream catchers, feathers, arrows) made appearances on nearly every page. We suspect these design elements were chosen due to their tie-in to their school mascot. These elements didn't take anything away from the layouts because they were incorporated in a way that didn't overwhelm the page. Other pieces were occasionally added for variety, but always following their school color palette. Custom endsheets and special treatments (matte laminate and embossing) on the cover were just the finishing touches this book needed.

Great use of theme in all parts of a yearbook.

Great use of theme in all parts of a yearbook.

 

Next up, a school that was very theme-conscious, but also took some liberties when designing for a specific club or organization (as seen on the "fabric & fashion" spread). The use of a specific color palette, design elements (arrows, again...do we spot a trend?) kept the flow of the book smooth even with a rule-breaker spread thrown in here and there. Once again, custom endsheets and special treatments (spot UV coating and matte lamination) on the cover add high quality, classy finishing touches to this yearbook.

Great use of theme in all parts of a yearbook.

Great use of theme in all parts of a yearbook.

We do realize there are schools that don't necessarily choose a theme for their entire book, rather, they enjoy designing pages based on the holiday or activity contained on the spread. For those schools, we offer some suggested Pictavo artwork that may not be categorized as "seasonal", but would work great when used in conjunction with the right clipart and fonts!

Using fall colors in yearbook spreads.

Using fall colors in yearbook spreads.

Using fall colors in yearbook spreads.

Using fall colors in yearbook spreads.

Happy Yearbooking!

{and Happy Thanksgiving}

The Pictavo Team