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Summer Yearbook Coverage

Five Tips To Covering Summer In Your Yearbook 

Just because you’re not IN school during the summer months, doesn’t mean there aren’t important things going on, begging to be captured and included in your yearbook. After all, isn’t the purpose of your YEARbook to tell the story of the entire year?

So how do you identify those stories and cover them? Check out these five great tips to follow as you enter into your summer months. Remember – sometimes the stories and happenings of the summer can be the most interesting! What happens in summer shouldn’t stay there—it should be captured in the yearbook!

1. Prepare in Advance 
Create a detailed plan with specific assignments for each staff member broken down by week. This helps make the tasks more manageable and easier to track progress. Your plan should include actionable items that each student can accomplish to contribute.

2. Make a Coverage List
Create a laundry list of coverage ideas (summer school, camps, jobs, vacations, volunteer activities, events, retreats, summer sports, fundraisers, etc.). Use social media to stay in the loop and find interesting stories to cover. 

3. Pair Up
Have a photographer and reporter pair up to cover an identified event together. Both can offer differing perspectives and help each other better capture the heart of the final story. Don't forget to use your "Press Badges" (or create some) to give your staffers credibility and make it easier for them to get interviews and photos. 

4. Don’t Forget School Staff
Teachers and other school staff use their summers to do all kinds of cool things. Some continue to teach or have other summer jobs while some travel, do research, take classes, vacation or spend time with their family. Be sure to include them when investigating potential story ideas and photo opportunities!

5. Be Ready for Back to School 
A lot happens in the final weeks before school starts and these activities provide great opportunities for coverage (sports tryouts, freshman orientation, classroom and school grounds preparation, club meetings, school board sessions, back to school shopping, etc.). 

2015 NSPA Yearbook Pacemaker Winners Announced at the Spring National High School Journalism Convention

Check out the 2015 winners of the National Scholastic Press Association's Yearbook Pacemaker award! The winners were announced at the JEA/NSPA Spring National High School Journalism Convention in Denver this past weekend and we got to be there! JEA (Journalism Education Association) and NSPA (National Student Press Association) are among the largest scholastic journalism organizations in the country. If your school isn't already a member, we would highly recommend you consider joining as they offer tremendous insight and resources to help you create an amazing yearbook. Congrats to all of this year's yearbook award winners and finalists!

 

"Since 1927, NSPA's Pacemaker competition has been considered by many to be student journalism's highest honor. All NSPA yearbook and magazine members are eligible to compete in their respective national Pacemaker competitions. Yearbook/Magazine Pacemakers are judged based upon the following criteria: writing/editing, design, content, concept, photography, art and graphics." (source: Studentpress.org)

Yearbook Planning Calendar - January Checklist

Here's your January checklist of items to do for your yearbook to keep you on track this year! Just click on the link to download the checklist to have on hand. 

Yearbook Planning Calendar - December Checklist

Here's your December checklist of items to do for your yearbook to keep you on track this year! Just click on the link to download the checklist to have on hand.