yearbook company

On Your Mark! Get Set! SELL!

Think it's too early to start selling yearbooks? WRONG! Knowing early in the year what kind of response you're getting from the student body helps you to plan how many pages and what kind of add ons your budget can afford for this year's book. There are some early-in-the-school year events that can help you sell your book. Take advantage! Get together with student council, school administration, or the activities director and see what kind of "bundles" you can create for students. For example:

Back to School Bundle - a sports pass/punch card (whatever your school currently uses), an official school t-shirt, and a yearbook for $XX.

Spirit Week/Homecoming Bundle - homecoming/mascot t-shirt, homecoming dance ticket, and a yearbook for $XX.

* Make sure you cover the expense of all the products, but the discount for purchasing together is substantial enough that they feel like they're getting a bargain!

Back to school gets expensive for families. Give people the option of ordering their book and putting a down payment on it at the beginning of the year and making two more payments throughout the school year.

Does your yearbook publisher have an online ordering option? Do parents know about it? It's handy to be able to hop on the internet and purchase a yearbook when it's at YOUR convenience, not just when someone sends home a flyer. Make sure parents are informed of their purchasing options!

Start doing some research on what has worked or not worked at your school in the past. Compare total sales from one year to another and try to figure out what the magic sales equation is!

Happy Selling!

The Idea Garden Team

The Hype About Type

If a picture is worth a 1000 words, why bother with type? Using type on a page is more than just a way to tell the story, the type itself is a design element and should be treated as such.  There are hundreds of fonts available, with so many choices, it may be tempting to use them all...at the same time...on the same page...please don't! If you do, the design goddesses shall frown upon you and corrupt your entire font library.

(probably not)

(...okay, for sure not. please, just don't do it.)

Fonts can be classified into families:

There's a saying that says "fonts that play together, stay together". Okay, that might not be exactly how the saying goes, but our point is this: when you find a combination that works, stick with it.  The fewer fonts used in your yearbook, the more cohesive the pages will appear. While it's tempting to use all of the fonts available to you, it is usually better to limit yourself to no more than 2-3 fonts on a page. Less really is more!

If only using a few fonts sounds boring to you, let us prove you wrong! By changing weight, font family style, size and mixing only a few fonts, you'd be surprised at how creative your text can look!

Keep it simple, keep it legible. The goal is to READ what you're working so hard on writing, right? There are a few things you should steer clear of with your type.

If you'd like a printable version of these tips, you can find them here, here and here. It's a great idea to have them hanging where yearbook staff can see them. A little reminder can go a long way!

Happy Type Wrangling!

The Idea Garden Team

It's Crunch Time!

For those of you that have a "spring delivery" book, it's officially crunch time. It's time to proof pages, make finishing touches and proof some more. Many publishing companies require early cover submission when you've chosen to design your own cover, commonly called a "custom cover". Check your submission dates and make sure you're design staff is on track with your cover design, final files and any other custom options you may have chosen. Often times, custom printed endsheets also require extra production time, and should be submitted with a custom cover. Once again, make sure you're sending all the necessary paperwork, digital files, and printouts your publisher needs to ensure that once your info is received, it's all smooth sailing for your project! Handing any part of your yearbook over to someone else for production can be nerve wracking...making doubly sure that all things are proofed thoroughly, filled out completely and submitted on time will save questions or miscommunications between you and your publisher.

Even though we're over halfway through January, we figured a checklist would still be helpful for those of you rushing around making sure everything is checked off your list!

Printable version here.

See that light over there? It's the end of the yearbook creation tunnel...you're almost there!

Happy Yearbooking!

The Idea Garden Team

Got It Covered | Exploring Options For Yearbook Covers

Your yearbook cover needs to "say it all" in one design statement. Your cover should motivate people to WANT to see what's inside. Whoever said you can't judge a book by it's cover, certainly couldn't have been talking about yearbooks! There are many options available to you when making decisions about yearbook covers. The most common is a four color printed cover.

If you'd like to add a little 'flair' to your four color cover, you can add some color foil and/or embossing.

Leatherette covers are often a more "traditional" look, but by using graphics that have a more modern edge, your cover can still be as unique as your student body!

If you really like bells and whistles, a leatherette cover with foil imprint and embossing may be just the cover for you.

Not all publishing companies offer all of the options mentioned above. When choosing who to print with, it's important to find out if they can provide your school with the options you'd like to see in a finished product. It's also important to find out if adding options to your cover will add cost or production time!

Speaking of time...it's time for another checklist! December is right around the corner and we want to make sure our readers are staying on task!

Print friendly version here.

Stay warm and happy yearbooking!

The Idea Garden Team

Organizing Your Yearbook Images

This is SUCH an important post! We cannot even tell you how many times we've heard advisors and yearbook staff say they 'no longer have those images' because someone saved over them or they just got lost in the shuffle. How frustrating! We know what a major project pulling together a yearbook is...this is one of those tips that will save your sanity! We promise! As your staff photographs the events at your school, make sure that:

A) the images are ALL. BACKED. UP. Burn DVDs of everything that might make it into the yearbook and store them somewhere. The fact that those photos made it onto a computer is NOT INSURANCE! If anything, heaven forbid, were to happen to the computer they are on, wouldn't it be nice to know that you have copies stored away safely somewhere? Back them ALL up. Back 'em up. Really. Back them up. (one more time?) BACK UP YOUR IMAGES!

and B) the images are organized in a way that the entire staff understands. Just because Janie knows that her folder named "best game ever" is the section finals for basketball, doesn't mean that Frankie will know that...he may think the state hockey playoffs were the best game ever. Below is a screen shot of a typical folder structure that will help organize your staff's photos.

As you'll notice, the example images are all saved as the native camera name. HOWEVER, also notice that keeping things in different folders will keep these images from saving over one another when they have the same name. To double-ensure your staff will not accidentally replace images on your server, it's a GREAT idea to name images what they actually are AND save them into the appropriate folder (i.e. Hansen 3 pointer.jpg INSIDE the BASKETBALL BOYS folder) The more specific you can make things, the easier it will be for the layout staff and the less likely it will be that files will get thrown out because they don't make sense to someone on a cleaning bender! 

To review: BACK UP and ORGANIZE! 

Do it. You'll be glad you did!

Happy Organizing!

The Idea Garden Team