Fall Into Yearbook...

Land on Your Toes this September with these 2013 Fall Trends

Yearbook design ideas and inspiration can be found everywhere – in a world with endless creative options you are limited by nothing. Design trends affect everything – from the top fashion designer to the electronics in your home to the vehicle you drive. All embrace varying trends each year. So we’ve compiled a list of the projected Fall 2013 Color and Design trends across the country to assist as you design your yearbook.

Fall Color Report
Fall Color Report

COLOR CRAZE Color is alive this Fall and there is no holding back. Earthy textures inspire palettes of blues, greens and browns. Bold, quirky and whimsical colors like pumpkin and bright blue with lime and violet offer an unlikely harmony. Bright tribal tones inspire palettes that mix sandy brown, fiery pink, peacock blue and vibrant tangerine. Preppy primary colors and bright white are modernized with shades of gray—or black. Quiet moss green, cobblestone gray and Shitake brown combine with vibrant fuchsia for a sleek, brooding feel. Whatever the mood you want your yearbook to convey, you are sure to find countless combinations that will bring it to life.

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shutterstock_136336661

Go Green Deep rich shades of green are here to stay this fall, and we couldn’t be happier they have been given the green light. This hue embodies the environmental movement our country has been experiencing over the past decade; so it’s no surprise the color has trickled down into everyday design. Emerald is Pantone’s 2013 Color of the Year and there is nothing Wicked about it - though it probably bears inspiration from that popular Broadway musical. Play up this vibrant color with different shades, or make a statement by highlighting an important section using different tints.

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shutterstock_109164185

Shades of Gray As much as you’d probably like a break from the phrase, it looks like every shade of gray is here for the fall. Around AD 700, the first documented use of gray was recorded. The rest is history. So don’t be shy about using gray – use it, and then use it some more. Whether it’s to mix up the color of text in your book, add shadow to photos, or depth to art; gray adds interest. White space? How about gray space? Choose a gray background color; experiment with it. Have fun. After all, there are no clear rules when it comes to gray areas.

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shutterstock_34601929

Black. White. Black and White Alone Black and White are very chic colors. But together they steal the show.  Expect to see both Black, White – and a combination of the two – this fall. The color Black is so rich with meaning and significance, both in popular culture and design, going all the way back to ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman eras. It’s classic and classy –  and a staple in nearly every closet (from the tux to the LBD). But Black’s opposite, White is just as important. And just as classic. White is often associated with honor and innocence. Don’t be afraid to mix these two colors when designing – fashionistas and designers will be taking full advantage of blending these two opposites in the coming months. Experiment with patterns and overlay to create contrast, distinction, counterbalance and visual statements.

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shutterstock_134984330-[Converted]

PITTER PATTERNS

They tiptoed their way into the design scene this past year and are on full bloom coming into fall. You certainly won’t find patterns going into hibernation anytime soon. Instead you’ll see the mixing of typically distracting and busy mosaics to be a delightful dichotomy. From Plaid to Madras to Gingham to Houndstooth; we know, it’s hard to keep them all straight. Check out Alexander West’s guide to patterns to help keep track of them all!

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shutterstock_51506032-[Converted]

Plaid Perfection Plaid is not by any means a new pattern – plaid, or tartan, the criss-crossing pattern, has origins dating between 400 and 100 BC. Tartan is most commonly associated with the Scottish, and was used to distinguish clansmen from one another. Throughout the years British royalty have popularized the pattern and the pattern has made its debut across the world.  Whether the pattern’s resurgence is due to the rising popularity surrounding the Royal Family, Burberry, or an idealized version of a grizzled looking man in popular television shows – we’re ecstatic the pattern is back. Play up the pattern, experiment with colors, this is one trend you should keep in your bagpipes.

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shutterstock_147204386-[Converted]

Floral is Fun

The second pattern that is trending this fall is floral.  Floral patterns first made an appearance in design during the Spring of 2012 and they’re still going strong.  The pattern originated in the east and Asia, and was a popular choice in the United States in the ‘70s. Unlike plaid, floral patterns represent femininity and beauty and should be used consciously in design. But don’t let the challenge of utilizing this pattern sway you – with infinite floral options available, get creative, let the design speak for itself.

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shutterstock_43421215

Your Wild Side

Animal prints are infiltrating design, and we’re wild about it.  Long gone are the days where feline prints were only found on clothing – from nails to stationary, the trend is taking hold. Before the 1940’s animal prints were synonymous with wealth and power; after the ‘40s and the women’s movement, animal print clothing and accessories became a staple in closets across the United States.  Animal print’s beloved predecessors, Bettie Page and Marilyn Monroe, would be pleased with the recent popularity in modernizing the adored pattern. This pattern can be especially effective for theme ideas with the right mascot.  However you choose to use this idea – have fun finding the purrrfect one (sorry, couldn’t resist), the pattern demands it!

Whichever trend, or trends, you choose to use in your yearbook, remember to take risks. Trends are created when people step outside the norm. They represent a snippet of culture. So have fun using them and creating your own as you get back into the yearbook season. And enjoy your first few weeks of the school year. Because like a trend, it may be over before you know it.